Wednesday, March 28, 2007

Tonga and Fiji and obesity, part 2

from w
I found a list of countries with the problem of obesity. Look how many in the top ten come from the South Pacific? Is it body shape that has biased the study? Would stats collected forty years ago be quite different?
Fiji is well down in the list, but perhaps that is because some thin people cut the statistics down from the fatties!

World's Fattest Countries

Lauren Streib 02.08.07, 12:01 AM ET

There are currently 1.6 billion overweight adults in the world, according to the World Health Organization. That number is projected to grow by 40% over the next 10 years. The following list reflects the percentage of overweight adults aged 15 and over. These are individuals who have individual body mass indexes, which measures weight relative to height, greater than or equal to 25. Obese is defined as having a BMI greater than or equal to 30.
Rank Country %
1. Nauru 94.5
2. Micronesia, Federated States of 91.1
3. Cook Islands 90.9
4. Tonga 90.8
5. Niue 81.7
6. Samoa 80.4
7. Palau 78.4
8. Kuwait 74.2
9. United States 74.1
10. Kiribati 73.6
11. Dominica 71.0
12. Barbados 69.7
13. Argentina 69.4
14. Egypt 69.4
15. Malta 68.7
16. Greece 68.5
17. New Zealand 68.4
18. United Arab Emirates 68.3
19. Mexico 68.1
20. Trinidad and Tobago 67.9
21. Australia 67.4
22. Belarus 66.8
23. Chile 65.3
24. Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of) 65.2
25. Seychelles 64.6
26. Bahrain 64.1
27. Andorra 63.8
28. United Kingdom 63.8
29. Saudi Arabia 63.5
30. Monaco 62.4
31. Bolivia 62.2
32. San Marino 62.1
33. Guatemala 61.2
34. Mongolia 61.2
35. Canada 61.1
36. Qatar 61.0
37. Uruguay 60.9
38. Jordan 60.5
39. Bahamas 60.4
40. Iceland 60.4
41. Nicaragua 60.4
42. Cuba 60.1
43. Germany 60.1
44. Brunei Darussalam 59.8
45. Slovenia 59.8
46. Peru 59.6
47. Vanuatu 59.6
48. Finland 58.7
49. Jamaica 57.4
50. Israel 57.3
51. Saint Lucia 57.3
52. Austria 57.1
53. Azerbaijan 57.1
54. Turkey 56.8
55. Tuvalu 56.6
56. Dominican Republic 56.5
57. Slovakia 56.3
58. Cyprus 56.2
59. Saint Kitts and Nevis 56.1
60. Costa Rica 55.8
61. Colombia 55.6
62. Antigua and Barbuda 55.5
63. Switzerland 55.4
64. Montenegro 54.9
65. Serbia 54.9
66. Serbia and Montenegro (The former state union of) 54.9
67. Albania 54.8
68. Fiji 54.8
69. Bulgaria 54.2
70. Luxembourg 54.2
71. Croatia 53.9
72. Bosnia and Herzegovina 53.8
73. Portugal 53.8
74. Armenia 53.3
75. Grenada 53.3
76. South Africa 53.3
77. Iran (Islamic Republic of) 53.2
78. Libyan Arab Jamahiriya 53.2
79. Lithuania 53.1
80. Lebanon 53.0
81. Czech Republic 52.9
82. Syrian Arab Republic 52.8
83. Spain 51.8
84. Hungary 51.6
85. Panama 51.4
86. Tunisia 51.0
87. Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 50.6
88. Brazil 50.5
89. Belize 49.8
90. Sweden 49.7
91. Norway 49.1
92. Russian Federation 49.1
93. El Salvador 48.7
94. Lesotho 48.5
95. Suriname 47.8
96. Paraguay 47.7
97. Guyana 47.5
98. Poland 47.5
99. Latvia 47.3
100. The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia 47.2

6 comments:

Gilbert Veisamasama, Jr said...

They must have included a lot more Fijian athletes and rugby players in their data sampling hence Fiji's appearance way later on that list. But then again, we don't really much of "fat" (sorry for the word) Fijians these days.

Gilbert Veisamasama, Jr said...

I meant, we really don't see a lot of "fat" Fijians around.

Peceli and Wendy's Blog said...

I think a lot depends on the data sampling - age, gender, ethnicity, town or country people. Was it a big sample taken? Maybe just uni students?
Is the perception still that a 'thin' Fijian doesn't look well? And that a 'large' person has status?
It shouldn't be so of course.
The changing diet does make a difference though - and diabetes is one in five people in Tonga a doctor reported in the SBS program.

Gilbert Veisamasama, Jr said...

The perception, to me, is that a thin or fit looking Fijian is more acceptable these days.

Pandabonium said...

Hawaiians were a fit people when first contact was made by Europeans (judging by the drawings and paintings of them). That was still true in the late 19th century as can be seen from photos, with perhaps the exception of wealthy people, like the royal family. But today, obesity and diabetes are major problems for Hawaiians, and of course related to diet - meat, sugar, etc. - and a less active lifestyle.

Dr.Gwendolyn Gottlieb said...

It won’t be particularly wrong to call the USA the obesity capital of the world. Obesity is nothing less than an epidemic in this country and it is still alarmingly rising even among the children. Researchers have found that obesity is also fast increasing among the American women and especially those women who have been married to an unhappy relationship. Women having an unhappy married life have been found to have gained around 54 pounds in average in the first 10 years of their unhappy marriage. http://www.phentermine-effects.com