Showing posts with label Fiji and gambling. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Fiji and gambling. Show all posts

Thursday, October 28, 2010

A casino for Fiji! Gross idea!

from w
I really dislike the idea of a casino in Fiji, even if only for tourists. They are placed where there often greed, crime, and completely different from a Pacific lifestyle of generosity, smiles, and a clean environment. So each time the topic of a possible casino for Fiji, I find that grossly unattractive. Money to alleviate poverty. Come on, come on. Gambling breeds poverty. Listen to advice by people who know what damage casinos and other forms of gambling can do to families. It's easy to say that profits can be shared by owner and government, but it just ain't worth it.
From Fiji fbc.
Fiji casino funds for poverty alleviation
Friday, October 29, 2010

All funds government will earn from the operation of Fiji’s first casino will go towards poverty alleviation says Prime Minister Commodore Voreqe Bainimarama.

Government has invited expressions of interest for the development and operation of the first casino in Fiji. Bainimarama told FBC News that only one licence will be given for the casino operation. He says a number of interested parties have expressed their interest – and will be required to apply for the license. The PM says they are still drafting the appropriate legislation to cover the casino operations. He says only tourists will be allowed to use the Casino.

The Methodist church has told FBC News they will comment on the casino issue once they have studied the proposal.

Report by : Masimeke Latianara
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and from CCF
CCF expresses ‘deep reservations’ on plan for Fiji casino
16:42 September 18, 2009Fiji, Pacific Press Releases1 comment
The Citizens’ Constitutional Forum (CCF) expresses deep reservations about the decision by the Interim Government to allow a casino to open in Fiji.

“It is known world over that casinos can have collateral damages. Big time gambling can be a source of addiction leading to financial bankruptcy and irreplaceable loss of much needed family income, which could aggravate rather than resolve poverty,” CCF Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Rev Akuila Yabaki said.

“The opening of any casino would require strict legislation and it would be unfair discrimination to prevent locals from accessing the casino altogether or to place higher regulations on their participation than foreigners,” Rev Yabaki said.

Suitable regulations would need to be in place to ensure that appropriate consideration is given to:

• The impact on social welfare and culture;

• Mismanagement of finances (possible increase in debt and poverty);

• Gambling addictions (and associate problems such as alcohol/drug abuse and depression);

• The location and/or number of casinos should be determined only after a comprehensive impact assessment report is done.

“It should be able to benefit the people of Fiji, including the local economy, and not just visiting tourists and overseas investors and measures need to be in place to address any adverse impact this development might have,“ Rev Yabaki said. “Only one casino should be sufficient for a country like Fiji.”

For further information, contact CCF on ph: 3308379 or fax: 3308380.

Rev Akuila Yabaki
Chief Executive Officer

Citizens’ Constitutional Forum Limited
23 Denison Road, PO Box 12584, Suva, Fiji
Phone: [679] 3308 379 Fax: [679] 3308 380
E-mail: ccf@connect.com.fj
Website: www.ccf.org.fj
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added on Saturday 30th
from fiji fbc
Hey, I reckon there's more to a casino than just making money for the Fiji government. There's the whole ethical notion about greed, and also winning and losing. Crime, money laundering, lots of things are associated with casinos that should be questioned seriously. The Methodist Church leaders need to pull up their socks and speak up loudly and clearly, not wait for another day, another time.

Tourism sector supports casino
Saturday, October 30, 2010

The Fiji tourism association believes the announcement by government to set up a casino in Fiji would increase visitor arrivals in the country. Association president Dixon Seeto says it will not only attract visitors from the Asian market but increase Fiji’s revenue earnings in the tourism sector. He says Air Pacific’s flight to and from Hong Kong will also feel the effect as more visitor from Hong Kong will be coming to Fiji.

Seeto says government made a smart move by putting in place certain measures to control and protect the locals from negative social impacts that could arise once casino begins operations. The association believes the setting up of a casino in Fiji would also create employment opportunities. He told FBC news that the legislations that would govern the operations of the casino in Fiji would eliminate the gambling problems experienced by other countries that have casinos.

Report by : Maca Lutunauga

Tuesday, September 22, 2009

A story about a casino

from w
I've written two short stories set in the Crown Casino Melbourne. This is the shorter one about a Pacific Islander Security Officer as many Islanders work in Security jobs. The idea came to me when a family I know got into heaps of trouble to do with gambling. The story is meant to be read aloud by softening some of the consonants and changing r to l, etc.! Malo lelei to any Tongan readers of this blog and my apologies if there is anything offensive here!

Mililei Security officer

My work is in Security and I thank the Lord that I have a job. My name is Mililei Fakalialiaafa’ola and my father is a noble, the Baron Isiliesa Potipotila’afu. Thank you Jesus that I have a good job at the Casino and I get sixteen dollars an hour just for being nice to people. My father back in Tonga, he don’t get that much money in one day.

Well, yesterday I go to the patron’s toilet because I’ve got to go quick ‘cause I’m pregnant you know, and I can’t hold my water and I can’t get to the staff one quick enough. I go to the one with the gold taps, you know, with the beautiful mirrors and the flowers and the lovely lights. Praise the Lord for the beautiful world we live in. Well, a lady there is crying so much she can’t stop. She looks a nice lady with her lovely black dress and her diamond earrings. She is as old as my Mum, Lady Ololiafa’alia’afiga. Thank you Jesus that my Mum is still alive and she loves the Lord. Yes.

I say to the lady, ‘Dear, what’s the matter?’ But she just cry and cry. She points to the door and I say to her, ‘Can I help you,’ then she say, ‘My husband won’t go home, he just won’t leave this place.’

I know what’s the matter then. Lots of husbands are here and they just won’t leave. Some even won’t go to the toilet, you know. True, it’s true. Thank you Jesus that I can talk to this lady. I say, ‘Calm down and sit down,’ but then I know the toilet is not a nice place to sit in so I take her to a small lounge away from the other people.

She say to me, ‘Get me a cup of tea, honey.’

Before I go, three men they come in with cameras and you know, cameras are not allowed here, so I stand up straight, show them my badge and say to them, ‘Take your cameras away. You get out of here quick!’

Then one man he say, ‘I just want a photo of the lady because her husband is in the news now because he just spent plenty million dollars that don’t belong to him.’

I just say, ‘Get out of here. Leave the nice lady alone.’

They get out and I talk to the crying lady as she drinks her tea. She say, ‘He is obsessed, honey, he is utterly obsessed. He looks for that high all the time but it is elusive.’

I don’t know the meaning of that word but my father, the Baron Isiliesa Potipotila’afu he know that word. But I know what she means because I see the look in the eye of the men and women here. They got the fire in their eye, just like some of the men and women in our church, the Westside Holy City Church. When we sing in the spirit, you know, when the Holy Ghost comes on you, you know, and your eyes are on fire. It’s the same thing. Well, not really. This other one’s from the devil in this place. Our pastor he tell me, ‘Mililei, you shouldn’t work in that bad place. Find another job.’ But I can’t leave because every day I say, Thank you Jesus that I got a job.

Well the lady, she smile at me and she thank me, but I feel sorry for her you know, and I tell her, ‘This is my address in Craigieburn. Anytime you lonely, you come and see me.’ Then she cry again. ‘I live near Craigieburn, honey,’ she tell me.

I smile when she call me honey every time because I look at my hands and arms and yes, they look the colour of honey. Aiwei.

Friday, September 18, 2009

Yabaki gets it right sometimes

from w
I really dislike the idea of a casino in Fiji. The only casino I've been inside was Crown in Melbourne and it's a horrible place. I went there only to write a story.
Anyway Akuila gets it right this time - as reported by Scoop New Zealand. There's a comment added after the article from 'Bubu' but that's not me and I won't republish it here.

CCF expresses ‘deep reservations’ on plan for Fiji casino
16:42 September 18, 2009Fiji, Pacific Press Releases1 comment
Pacific Press Release – Citizens’ Constitutional Forum, 18 September 2009
CCF expresses reservations on opening of a casino
The Citizens’ Constitutional Forum (CCF) expresses deep reservations about the decision by the Interim Government to allow a casino to open in Fiji. “It is known world over that casinos can have collateral damages. Big time gambling can be a source of addiction leading to financial bankruptcy and irreplaceable loss of much needed family income, which could aggravate rather than resolve poverty,” CCF Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Rev Akuila Yabaki said.

“The opening of any casino would require strict legislation and it would be unfair discrimination to prevent locals from accessing the casino altogether or to place higher regulations on their participation than foreigners,” Rev Yabaki said. Suitable regulations would need to be in place to ensure that appropriate consideration is given to:
• The impact on social welfare and culture;
• Mismanagement of finances (possible increase in debt and poverty);
• Gambling addictions (and associate problems such as alcohol/drug abuse and depression);
• The location and/or number of casinos should be determined only after a comprehensive impact assessment report is done.

“It should be able to benefit the people of Fiji, including the local economy, and not just visiting tourists and overseas investors and measures need to be in place to address any adverse impact this development might have,“ Rev Yabaki said. “Only one casino should be sufficient for a country like Fiji.”
........
Website: www.ccf.org.fj

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Some of the reasons why I dislike gambling are set out here in a statement by Tim Costello, currently head of World Vision Australia, a Baptist minister.
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from Sydney Morning Herald, late 2007
State and territory governments rake in more than $4 billion a year in pokies taxes. The only exception is Western Australia, which apart from videopoker games in Perth's Burswood Casino, is pokies free. Our governments have a vile addiction to pokies revenue that is tearing apart families and communities.

Last year the gaming industry took more than $10 billion out of Australian wallets. And it is those who are least able to afford it who are most affected. The Productivity Commission's landmark 1999 report revealed that 42.3 per cent of pokies losses came from problem gamblers. That compared with 5.7 per cent for lotteries. More recent studies have put this at closer to 50 per cent of losses coming off the backs of the vulnerable and addicted.

The numbers are not insignificant. There are at least 220,000 Australians struggling with a gambling problem because of the pokies. They make up 80 per cent of all problem gamblers and for each problem gambler the lives of seven others, be they family or friends, are affected.

Close to 2 million Australians are in some way worse off because of the pokies bug. That doesn't include previous "generations" of addicts who can no longer be classified as problem gamblers because they have already lost everything and can no longer gamble.
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drawings added later - Tuesday. I'd illustrated a story in a small anthology and found it again, and the other drawing was made as I waited for a Christmas luncheon for women to be set up - at the Leopold Sports Club. I discovered that I'd posted it and written about 'Wowsers' in this blog 23rd January earlier this year.